This Week in Links 47

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share. Here's what's on tap this week:

  • The 9 Rules of Every Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner Cartoon. The rules of this universe are incredibly detailed, specific, and NEAT.
  • The official list of approved catcallsI’M SURE YOU'RE BUSY. THIS WILL ONLY TAKE A SECOND AS YOU'RE BIKING PAST: I BET YOU HAVE AN INDOMITABLE SPIRIT.
  • Michael Bolton the singer as Michael Bolton the IT worker in Office Space. STILL a good joke.
  • American states, foods, and puns. It's a great day.
  • Friend of the show Kelly Jensen over at BookRiot has collected a ton of literary Final Jeopardy answers (and questions).
  • The New Yorker has a fascinating article about Chinese censorship of translated (often American, but not always) books: But for an editor like Zhang, who is not a Party member, there is no ideology and no absolute list of banned subjects. His censorship is defensive: rather than promoting an agenda or covering up some specific truth, he tries to avoid catching the eye of a higher authority.
  • Last Week Tonight asks the hard questions about Daylight Saving Time: how is this still a thing?
  • I'm normally philosophically opposed to lists of things you "ought" to do by a certain age, but this Jezebel list of 13 Things You Should Really Have In Your Closet By the Time You're 30 is right on: 4. Something That Works as a Vibrator in a Pinch An old dustbuster? An electric shoe polisher? Really loud old fan? You get the idea.
  • Spend some time with the #SofterActionHeroes hashtag.
  • Rembert Browne on Barack Obama for GrantlandPeople who will tell you that, ultimately, they’re happy they came up short. But people who will still openly admit it’s something they think about all the time.
  • BuzzFeed's "What's Your Gender?" quiz is maybe the best of all quizzes.
  • We lost Terry Pratchett this week, which was a big blow. You should read Neil Gaiman and Kieron Gillen on his legacy, and Jess Zimmerman on the everlasting moral power of Good OmensIn a lot of ways, I am at my core a golem of popular culture. I built my self-concept out of the books that shaped me, and even though it can now walk around on its own and eat dinner and fall in love and have opinions and all the things an organic creature does, if you rubbed out the magic words it would collapse into a pile of dusty tomes.