This Week in Links 81

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

This Week in Links 80

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • The URL for this is "just some damn good cat tattoos." Like you do.
  • Kara Brown on police shootings of black peopleWe ache and we yell and we hope that, eventually, the obvious weight of all this pain will be enough to move something to change. But at times hoping in public feels even more precarious. We cannot appeal to a national conscience when, as Stokely Carmichael reminded us, there is none.
  • Keiynan Lonsdale is going to be Kid Flash, and look how adorable he is.
  • NASA calling their Jupiter probe "Juno" is a really good joke.
  • Gymnastics Hair: A Retrospective. This is deeply, deeply in our wheelhouse.
  • Rembert Browne on Lin-Manuel Miranda's last night in HamiltonWhich made it comically difficult for Aaron Paul to get where he needed to go.
  • Just over here making grabby hands at this Rogue One trailer.
  • Here's a useful chart to help you talk like a sailor. Don't be such a jaw-me-down.
  • Check out the world's oldest library.
  • Atlas Obscura has a neat article on the history of "girl mayors"She had extensive training in chemistry, and reportedly took all the alcohol she seized in raids back to her own laboratories for analysis. However, the media remained obsessed with one central question—how could someone so young, so beautiful, so female, govern a town?
  • OK, this literally made me laugh out loud, and now my coworker and I make the face from the fifth panel to each other when we tell horrible jokes.

This Week in Links 79

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • John Cena did an ad for America and it is hands fucking down the greatest thing you'll see this week. Happy birthday, America.
  • This is a charming story on the origin of the phrase "dumpster fire," and indeed on the concept of the Dumpster at all, and I'm very grateful for it leading me to the Wikipedia entry on inherently funny wordsIn British English, for example, one is more likely to hear the term "skip" to denote a large garbage receptacle, but does "skip fire" grab one as an equally startling and appealing barb to deploy on Twitter? What about "Donald Trump's presidential campaign has been a complete wheelie bin fire"? Not so much. 
  • Whoever wrote the headline "An earl in the streets and a wild man in the sheets" for this Bitch article about Tarzan and female gaze deserves a BIG raise.
  • This article/video about tagging great white sharks with cameras so we can figure out why they all congregate in the middle of the Pacific every year is pretty fun. Props to the scientist who called it shark Burning Man.
  • As always, the Rock is an extremely fun person. (What was the budget for this?)
  • Justin Trudeau referred to his friendship with Obama as "dudeplomacy." Be still my heart.
  • We lost Pat Summitt this week. (Shoutout to friend of the show Aggie for teaching me about her and her baller ways.) Holly Anderson wrote a beautiful tribute to her: We who remember her are left only to assume that she has departed this life secure in the knowledge that if we haven't picked up on what she tried to teach us by this point, we're not about to start. And she didn't go through all that for us to up and decide we're worse off now.
  • Beyonce and Kendrick Lamar. 
  • This woman Irish dancing to "Guns and Ships" from Hamilton is amaaaazing. Also, she's wearing old timey clothes in a charming cabin, so this is Irish as all get out, to my very American eyes.
  • This Toast piece -- "Things Lucy Maud Montgomery Lied To Me About" -- well, I seriously know those feels: That life would involve many, many, many more sunset vistas and clouds soaring over hills and many fewer hours spent sitting in rush-hour traffic and many fewer days spent living in apartment buildings with views of dumpsters. 
  • The Toast has ended. *crying emoji* The Washington Post and NPR both have very beautiful tributes to a weird, funny, specific website that made you feel a little less alone with your eccentricities.
  • E.B. White on the meaning of democracy.

This Week in Links 78

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

This Week in Links 77

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

This Week in Links 76

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • This is an interesting article about what it's like to be a "historical adviser" on period movies: I have become very adept at giving three-minute lectures to buses and tents crammed full of extras, but whenever I get the chance I usually disappear off to the props trailer to see what exciting treasures have been sourced for the day’s scenes and exploit the chance to handle artefacts in a way that is impossible in a museum or archive.
  • Racked has a super neat story about Mojoro, the woman who invented cosplay.
  • This is from a few weeks ago, but if you haven't seen the video of Chris Evans and Elizabeth Olsen dancing on Ellen, you should, and if you have, watch it again.
  • Ditto for this video of the Obamas dancing with R2-D2 and a Stormtrooper. Seriously, why are we letting them leave office?
  • The Undefeated has an interesting profile of Nate Moore, the single African-American producer of the Marvel movies, and the reason we have a Black Panther on the big screen (in other words, thank you, Nate!).
  • Um, did you know Nigeria is killing everyone at Scrabble? And they're doing it by memorizing all the short words, which totally turns traditional Scrabble strategy on its head.
  • Allison Janney showed up and surprised the White House press corps by doing a briefing. She is perfect in every single way.
  • Deandre Levy, y'all: I was 18 years old — "man" enough to drive, vote and go to war — but somehow I didn’t have the courage, or the maturity, to see what they were talking about for what it was: a serious crime.

This Week in Links 75

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • The 2016 Eisner nominations are out! Including a record number of female creators.
  • How Much Would It Cost To Be Captain American? A lot, y'all. You gotta be friends with Tony Stark for a reason.
  • The press tour for Captain America 3 is starting up, which means charming bros are doing the rounds of talk shows, which is how we are now blessed to know Chris Evans knows all the words to The Little Mermaid. (Nobody call anybody a slut this time! Keep being this level of charming, guys.)
  • Kate Beaton went on a rant about "tit windows" in female comics characters' costumes, which was great, and the author of this Mary Sue post makes a good point (something we've said many times): It isn't simply that female characters "shouldn't be" scantily or impractically-clad, it's that their clothing should reflect who they are.
  • So Houston is having some terrible flooding right now, which is horrible, but the upside is this reporter rescuing a man on live TV. Of course I'm glad the guy is OK, but seriously, turn around don't drown, and also, the reporter's annoyance is my everything.
  • City Realty takes a guess at the costs of New York City homes in some children's literature classics. Surprise surprise, both Eloise and Harriet the Spy are clearly loaded.
  • In what small, meaningless ways do you rebel?
  • We lost Prince this week -- which, what the fuck, 2016 -- and you should read Wesley Morris on his sexualityIf Elvis was sex, Prince was a sexual orientation. His own. And it was oriented toward you. And you. And you.
    • While you're at it, read Alyssa Rosenberg in the Washington Post on Prince and Bowie and their visions of manhood: And now we've lost two men who had an expansive, almost luxuriant vision of what it meant to be a man and lived out that vision through decades when it was much less safe to do so.
    • And then finish off with two views of the Hamilton cast's tribute to Prince.

This Week in Links 74

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

This Week in Links 73

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Fortune has picked Dr. Carla Hayden -- who President Obama has nominated to be the next Librarian of Congress (get on that, Senators) -- as one of their World's Greatest Leaders.
  • This lady on Spain's Got Talent is full of surprises.
  • Interesting interview with YA author Anna Breslaw on portraying sex in YA and in fanfiction: For teens whose sexual interests lie outside of whatever’s being discussed or not discussed at their schools, joining fanfic communities — and reading fiction in general — is one way to explore. Which is why the way sex is discussed within these fictional settings matters. 
  • New research shows that much of the book-buying being done right now is by millennial women who read Harry Potter as teens and are now grown, and we're shaping the trends for what books go really big.
  • Um, Syfy made a movie where members of 90s boybands team up to fight zombies in the Old West? I had to Google to confirm this was real, but yes, it is.
  • I greatly enjoy the Actual Teen vs. Adult Teen Tumblr. This weirds me out in all movies/TV shows, even though I understand why you don't want to hire minors if you don't have to.
  • Jennifer Weiner in the New York TimesIn this strangest of primary seasons, women exist primarily in terms of their relationships to the men they marry or question or critique. They can either be beauties or beasts or "the love of my life." They can be "crazy" or "losers," "fat pigs" or "dogs."
  • #HowDoYouSeeMe
  • An interview with children's book author and illustrator Oliver Jeffers.
  • This month marks 20 years since "MMMBop." Yes, 20 years. The grim specter of death comes for us all: Interestingly, "MMMBop" was actually too high [the notes] by the time it was recorded for Middle of Nowhere! And we were playing it lower on our first tour.

This Week in Links 72

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Paul Rudd's hotness peak is still clearly a ways off in the future. (Becca's email said, "Our readers deserve to see this photo.")
  • The women of Hamilton perform famous feminist quotes for Women's History Month. This video is giving me life.
  • The Hamilton crew were at the White House this week, and Lin-Manuel Miranda freestyled about government in the Rose Garden while Obama held the cue cards and a drummer from the Marine Band provided the beat. Did you ever in your life imagine anything like this? Goddamn I'm gonna miss this president.
  • Speaking of the White House and Women's History Month (but not of Hamilton), they'd like our help finding the original Declaration of Sentiments.
  • There is a huge plagiarism scandal happening in the crossword puzzle world: "The animating impulse of crosswords is, 'How can I do something new in this medium?'"
  • Jennifer Garner is killing her post-divorce media tour, just killing it.
  • This gorgeous NPR story about a schoolboy coining a new word -- "petaloso," meaning full of petals -- is just lovely. (It also bears surprisingly similarities to the kids' book Frindle.)
  • Entertainment Weekly takes a deep dive into the Captain America 3: Civil War trailer. Our bodies are not ready.
  • Acting in a Terrence Malick movie sounds bananas: "We're all standing there and Malick hands out these pieces of paper to all of us," Lennon said. "And the one he gave me said, 'There's no such thing as a fireproof wall.' And I ask, 'Is this something I'm supposed to say in the scene?' and he said, 'I don't know.'"
  • JJ Abrams on why Leia hugged Rey, and not Chewie. Force-powerful ladies hugging!
  • We're big fans of the Special Olympics around here, and we're both big babies about winter, so Lady Gaga doing a polar plunge in Chicago to raise money for them: well, damn, woman, good work.
  • I'm not crying, I'm just reading this story about a penguin and the guy who saved him and it's raining on my face: 'I have never seen anything like this before. I think the penguin believes Joao is part of his family and probably a penguin as well.

    'When he sees him he wags his tail like a dog and honks with delight

This Week in Links 71

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Disappointed to find sexism in even the Oxford Dictionary, that most sacred of texts.
  • In better reference news, I just wanna roll around in this thesaurus of colors.
  • Two great Harry Potter links: Venn diagrams (you know we love charts), and the adventures of Hogwarts' new IT guyPlease. If you need something fixed send me a text, not a bird.
  • What It’s Really Like to Work in Hollywood* (*If you’re not a straight white man.) is a damning piece from the New York Times where actors, writers, directors -- famous people you've heard of -- talk in their own words about their experiences.
  • Two great stories about famous people reaching out to kids: Kendrick Lamar took some kids from Compton (his old neighborhood) to the Grammys, and John Lewis attended a meeting of the Free Minds Book Club, a book club for incarcerated youth in Washington, DC.
  • Stephanie Toti is a badass we should be paying attention to -- she's representing Texans' right to choose at the Supreme Court right now, and as a young Latina lawyer, her opponents consistently, infuriatingly, underestimate her: As the case wound its way through the lower courts, Toti repeatedly had to remind the Texas attorneys that she is the lead counsel on the case. But they consistently directed communications to her co-counsel -- a taller, slightly older man from the international law firm Morrison & Foerster. "They would always reach out to him and not even 'cc' me," she said. "I would get back to the lawyers and say, 'Here is our position,' and the next time they would go back to him anyway." 
  • TIME looks at some of TV's greatest female friendships.
  • Talk about a real Sophie's choice: Who's Worse, Ross Gellar or Ted Mosby?
  • This video of how Oscar statuettes get engraved is pretty interesting (and features Leonardo DiCaprio doing a remarkable imitation of a chill, friendly guy).
  • Playbill has a neat piece on what's involved in some of the theatre jobs behind the scenes, like the company manager (who coordinates with the Secret Service so Obama can see Hamilton).
  • Virginia McLaurin meets the Obamas

This Week in Links 70

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Welp, to the surprise of no one, Hamilton at the Grammys (#Gram4Ham) was pretty great, and Lin's acceptance speech was electric.
  • Awesome Tumblr: Women Fighters in Reasonable Armor. Also, their tagline, "ladies that actually dress for dealing damage," is pretty badass too.
  • This New Yorker article about gravitational waves really helped me understand why the hell that was such a big deal, last week.
  • In more space news, the best job title in the world -- seriously, the best -- belongs to Lindley Johnson, NASA's new Planetary Defense Officer.
  • The quail of West Texas respond to Justice Antonin Scalia's death: "Sure, Scalia conveniently discarded his entire jurisprudential philosophy in Columbia v. Heller, when he mangled the Second Amendment to allow pretty much anyone with four fingers and a thumb to carry around a gun. On the other hand, that's all we quail have EVER known. So, you know, welcome to our world, assholes."
  • Slate talks about what happened to Shiba Inus -- a once-rare breed in the US -- once they became a popular meme.
  • This video of a service dog in training meeting Pluto at Disneyland will make your heart grow three size.
  • Y'all is a Feminist Pronoun
  • The New York Times has a fascinating article about a con man who is (probably) named Jeremy Wilson, and all the scams he's pulled: He once maintained an Irish accent so well and for so long that his cellmate in an Indiana jail was convinced that he was an Irish mobster.

    "You have to give him some grudging respect," said Brian A. Clark, his cousin and also a victim, having had his identity stolen by Mr. Wilson in the early 1990s. "He's a proper villain. He's just got flair."

This Week in Links 69

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

This Week in Links 68

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • This has been a tough week, y'all. We've lost a lot of the greats.
  • It's Hamilton week over at Vulture. How to even choose what gift to highlight? 
  • This Guardian story on a Syrian refugee's stay with a single English woman -- told from both their perspectives -- is charming and funny and provides much needed humanity: Another thing that was unusual was the cookery books Helen has in her kitchen. In Syria your mum tells you how to cook, not a book. I also noticed people here wear their outdoor outfits even when they’re home. Why would anyone want to be in jeans when they don’t have to? The first couple of weeks were a bit strange for both of us, I think. Like the first few minutes in a football match, where both teams are a bit cautious of each other.
  • This Twitter feud between Emo Kylo Ren and Very Lonely Luke is bringing me a lot, like a lot, of joy.
  • Please watch Adele do carpool karaoke with James Corden. And then please let us know how to get in touch with Adele. Please. (This link also has an interesting interview with the James Corden producer who set it all up.)
  • President Obama just gave his last State of the Union speech last week. Mic has an interesting article on what's involved in being the "designated survivor" -- the member of the President's cabinet who doesn't attend the speech in case of a massive attack. And New York has an interesting article from Jon Favreau (no, not that one) on being Obama's speechwriter during the early days of the 2008 campaignSo I was in my apartment with everyone over, I've had a beer or two, but immediately I kick everyone out, I change over to Red Bull and coffee, and I walked down to the campaign at midnight and stayed up all night until about 10 or 11 a.m. the next day, and I wrote the JJ speech. And I finished the draft and for the first time, you know, Obama sees it and he's like, "I actually don't have that many edits. I think it's a pretty good speech."
  • Reading the ABCs from space -- man, science is cool.
  • Have You Seen My Helmet?
  • Sulagna Misra is so, so, so smart on the idea of the "Internet Boyfriend"If #banmen is a negative expression (what we don’t want), then the internet boyfriend is the positive version (what we do). They're not necessarily realistic examples. Instead, they’re examples of our shared fantasies — fantasies that no rom-com is able to give us.
  • As we've done on past MLK Days, we'll close out with Dr. King's Letter From Birmingham Jail. This year, we're adding a piece from Rachel Held Evans on the context of the letter, and this video of #MLKNOW, an event held in New York today. You need to hear these great artists reading his words aloud.

This Week in Links 67

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Begin as you mean to go on: with ladies just fucking killing it. (Check out the rehearsal, too.)
  • In more ladies killing it news, the Pennsylvania Ballet takes no prisonersSo no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs.
  • Set your alarms, pack an extra blanket, and fill your Thermos with coffee: here are the 101 best astronomical events of 2016. At least one of these is worth ruining your whole next day for.
  • Kate Beaton's traditional Home For Christmas comics are all up, and are, as ever, funny and warm and beautiful.
  • The best part of this tiger/goat friendship is that it was NOT instigated by the park employees, who seem baffled by the whole thing. You go, Timur and Amur.
  • Jia Tolentino has a powerful, thoughtful essay on offense and outrageBut at the end of 2015, it should be clear: offense doesn’t work that way. The offense model has failed, and dramatically. Women have a prominent voice in online media; feminism is a broad and verbally defended platform, and what has it all amounted to except a nightmarish discursive juxtaposition between what feminism says and what it is able to do? Pop stars preach female solidarity while reproductive rights roll back all over the country; we have politicized and vindicated every possible manifestation of female narcissism without getting any legislative movement towards mandatory paid parental leave. Feminism is proliferating essentially as merchandise; we can buy anything that suits us and nothing that we really need.
  • This video of Stormtroopers twerking was part of the Star Wars preshow when I saw it at the Alamo Drafthouse in Dallas, and it is freaking delightful.
  • In more Star Wars news, some men's rights activists claim that their pushback against the "SJW agenda" of The Force Awakens cost the movie, by their (bad) reasoning, just over four million dollars. Which they touted as a victory. Over a movie that's made over a billion dollars already. Isn't that adorable?
  • Dream job alert: meme librarianWithout archiving, no one knows what the primary source document is. Once you start archiving, you can tell, "Oh, this photo originally appeared on this person’s blog in Japan, and then 4chan made doge. The importance of sitting down to find these sources gives the creator the credit he/she deserves. Sometimes it gets buried under all the we-heart-its and the rebloggys, but without sitting down and saying, "This is important," the creator loses his content – and that’s not fair.
  • Let's close it out with Aretha Franklin covering "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and causing Carole King to lose her mind. Aretha Franklin is 73 years old and wearing a floor-length fur coat. 

This Week in Links 66

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Rebecca Solnit has a delightful new essay, "Men Explain Lolita to Me"Saying this upset some men. Many among that curious gender are easy to upset, and when they are upset they don’t know it (see: privelobliviousness). They just think you’re wrong and sometimes also evil.
  • ESPN and Marvel teamed up to create superhero-esque art for the IMPACT25 honorees, and the results are gorgeous. We're particularly in love with Annie Wu's drawing of ballerina Misty Copeland, and Kate Niemczyk's illustration of Loretta Lynch -- whoa.
  • "Season's Greetings From Tom & Carlos": they have fun over on the Flash set, obviously. Weird fun, but fun.
  • Vulture has some depressing-ass charts to contrast the ages of three of our biggest female stars against the ages of the men they're romantically paired with on film.
  • We linked to a piece by Ta-Nehisi Coates last roundup on his work writing the Black Panther, but here's a roundup of his complete writing on it: When I first started writing, I was anxious that I would be pigeon-holed into the "race-beat." Eventually I realized that the "race beat" was actually the "humanity beat," and that questions about "racism" are really questions about the exercise of power. Perhaps more importantly I realized that "race" was an essential thread of American society, and questions about race were questions about the very nature of the Western world. I wasn’t pigeon-holed, I’d fallen into a gold-mine. America is the most powerful country in the world. You simply can’t understand how it got that way without understanding "race."
  • Hamilton Lyrics To Sing To Your Dog
  • Lin-Manuel Miranda was on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert where he and Stephen performed a rap about one of the Declaration of Independence's lesser known signers, Georgian Button Gwinnett. It's pretty great, and we don't name enough kids "Button" anymore.
  • Mumblemumble about the idea of "required reading" at all, but this roundup of "required reading for women" -- a collection of non-fiction writing from 2015 -- has a lot of really great stuff in it.
  • This Wall Street Journal piece about the Broadway Show Bowling League -- in which teams of Broadway performers and techs bowl on Thursday nights -- sounds like the best kind of fever dream. (I first learned about this hearing Joshua Malina give a talk while I was in college, and was, for years, not totally sure he wasn't making it up, but it's ALL TRUE): Few in the league are competitive, but Mr. Stanek has invoked the mock ire of several bowlers who have taken to yelling "Stanek" whenever they throw a gutter ball. The grudge against him: He was a key member of a team called The Flying Pigs until he booked "Fun Home," deserted the Pigs and created a team with his new cast members.
  • This is our last link roundup of 2015, so let's close the year out right: Pentatonix performs a medley of the Star Wars music, and so does the cast of The Force Awakens, plus Jimmy Fallon and the Roots.

This Week in Links 65

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Texas Monthly has a great, heartwarming story about the Rotan Yellowhammers, Texas' smallest high school marching band (24 strong).
  • Wendy Davis wrote an essay for Lena Dunham's newsletter called "I Fucking Hate to Lose," and in reading it, you will once again remember that the alternate universe where she is the governor of Texas is probably a better, gentler world than the one we currently inhabit: That journey has taught me that, while it's easy to see the value of success in winning something that you've tried for, tremendous benefits also come from the work involved in losing. Because there is value in fighting for something important to you, even when the outcome is not what you hoped it would be.
  • Jennifer Weiner gives us the term "Goldfinching" to describe the phenomenon of critics disparaging literary novels after they become popular with women.
  • Check out this great sneak peek into Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther: One thing I did not count on was the extent to which the art would shape the story. Brian’s thoughts on T’Challa, and his supporting cast, have been invaluable. You can see the fruits of collaboration ... But this idea (and others) really came out of Brian’s thoughts—not just on the suit—but on the properties of Vibranium itself.
  • Why women's pockets are useless: A history
  • This New York Times story about Rojava -- an unrecognized state in Syria and Turkey that's explicitly feminist and environmentalist -- is amazing.
  • There's a $24 dress on Amazon that's become a favorite among America's female meteorologists, which actually says a lot about what it's like to be a female meteorologist.
  • Dave Grohl competes in a drum off with Animal from the Muppets. So that's pretty great.
  • Rolling Stone brings us the oral history of the "Bohemian Rhapsody" scene from Wayne's WorldI just love the song. It's ballsy that it's that long. It's ballsy that it's two songs in one, that's it's opera. Then when it kicks in, it's just such a fantastic release. I didn't think of another possibility.
  • The Associated Press has released their top 100 news images of the year. This is always a bracing look at what the big issues of a year really were.
  • In less serious photography news, the 2015 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are out. Get on that.

This Week in Links 64

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Exciting new updates about the anthology we're a part of (Wendy Davis!!!).
  • Being asked to participate in a photoshoot like this is pretty much the ideal level of fame.
  • Here's a lovely story on a project to photograph and interview older trans folks, including a lot of the photos and snippets of the interviews. What a great idea, what a necessary thing: "I think because there's this aging component and because there is this element about deciding how much something is worth to you with your own mortality in mind or deciding who you want to be, how you want to live, and realizing at some point the risks you've been so afraid of are worth taking," Dugan said.
  • Vox has a great profile of Sana Amanat. I really want to be her when I grow up.
  • Every Frame a Painting has a wonderful video explaining the genius of Buster Keaton, and how the film and humor techniques he invented are still used today (your favorite sight gag: Keaton was probably the first).
  • The New Yorker has a fantastic story about Megan Phelps-Roper -- yes, from the Westboro Baptist Church Phelps -- and how Twitter inspired her to leave her family's church. I read it days ago and I'm still thinking about it.
  • Tom and Lorenzo provide what is functionally a thesis paper on the fashions of Clueless. Get yourself to class: With these plaid looks (a motif Cher practically owns throughout the film, in at least a dozen costumes), it’s also a way of establishing the influence Cher and Dionne have over many of the other girls in the school. When you scan background characters in large scenes, you’ll see knockoff versions of these and other noticeable Cher and Dionne costumes.
  • Let's pair that wine with the cheese that is Paul Rudd dancing in his Ant-Man costume (yes that is a horrible forced joke, no I am not sorry).
  • NASA launched Voyager in 1977, and they included with it a "Golden Record," with sounds and images chosen by by a committee led by Carl Sagan, that would explain life on Earth to anyone who found Voyager. That record, which is traveling further from Earth than anything else we've ever created, will likely outlast all life on this planet. Fucking haunting, right?
  • We're both big fans of Richard Scarry over here at TWiL HQ, so here's a neat piece about the way his most classic book, Richard Scarry's Best Word Book Ever, was updated to be less gender normativeWomen who are bears can have jobs that were traditionally reserved for men. And men who are bears can wear ribbons in their hair.

This Week in Links 63

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.

  • Hamilton link: Lin-Manuel Miranda was on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon and they had a "wheel of freestyle," which is just as glorious as it sounds.
  • Politico has a truly wonderful story about Rep. John Lewis' third act -- from civil rights activist to congressional representative to comic book hero: "Most superheroes are fictional. The exception is with us today," says Tom Heintjes, introducing Lewis and Aydin to a conference room packed with Dragon Con goers.
  • Supposedly, Disney is retiring the Princess Leia "slave outfit" from all Star Wars merchandise. Good! Her iconic look is the white dress and crazy buns anyway.
  • Best headline of the week: Death metal music attracts sharks, documentary crew finds out
  • Vulture has an ode to Daria (and Daria's black friend Jodie): That's right, the mandate was not to have a bombshell character, or a sexy villain, or a buzzkill character who appeared only to ruin the guys' good time. McGrath wanted something different. Something that was not only more true to real life, but representative of an underfed audience: smart teenage girls.
  • The New York Times rounds up some fierce young women serving as drum majors in college bands across the country.
  • Spoonflower -- a website that prints fabric with users' designs -- had a contest to design a post-apocalyptic toile. Hello, we're listening.
  • The Nation has a great piece on the power of black Mizzou football players striking (and it's been updated to reflect that they've gotten the president of the unversity to resign): There is no football team without black labor. That means there aren’t million-dollar coaching salaries without black labor. There isn’t a nucleus of campus social life without black labor. There isn’t the weekly economic boon to Columbia, Missouri, bringing in millions in revenue to hotels, restaurants, and other assorted businesses without black labor.
  • Two interesting library stories: Ask a Manager did an interview with a prison librarian, and NPR has a great story about introducing "Libromats," or combination libraries/laundromats, to impoverished areas of South Africa.
  • Jezebel has a great essay about Devon Sawa in Casper, aptly tagged "Casper the Friendly Sexual Awakening": Only then do we see his face, just as we remark Kat’s expression upon seeing it too. She looks like we looked, watching her: compelled, full of vague recognition and bewilderment. This moment is a lonely girl’s fantasy, and Kat, scuttled from town to town by her father, is a lonely girl. I knew the type well: no one was ever looking for us, until suddenly, someone did. 
  • This charming profile of a culinary librarian, who collects recipes and cookbooks, is adorable.
  • This comic about the difference between being Latino and Hispanic is really informative!
  • Stop what you are doing and read the dedication of Gloria Steinem's book. I'm not asking. 

This Week in Links 62

Since we record a new show every two weeks, on off weeks we do a link roundup of things we've read and want to share.